man drinking alcohol

Alcohol Awareness Month 2021: Are You Drinking Too Much During the Pandemic?

This April marks National Alcohol Awareness Month, an annual public health program organized by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence. First started in April 1987 as a way to reach college students with binge-drinking habits, the program has since expanded into a movement with the intent to educate people of all ages about the dangers of alcoholism and give them the resources they need to combat it.

Alcohol Awareness Month also strives to destigmatize alcoholism and substance abuse. Today, there countless people across the country who struggle with alcohol addiction but are in denial because of shame and the negative connotations that accompany alcoholism. Family members and friends may also be living in denial that their loved one has developed a problem and could be enabling them rather than helping them.

This may be especially true this year as we continue to live our lives in quarantine. COVID-19 disrupted our economy, our daily habits, and our relationships, and it’s no surprise that some have turned to alcohol to help them get through this uncertain time. According to the Associated Press, for example, U.S. sales of alcoholic beverages rose 55 percent in the week ending March 21 in 2020, and online alcohol sales were up 243 percent.

Below, we’ve outlined some signs that your casual drinking activities may have worsened and turned into alcohol abuse during the pandemic:

  • You’re consuming more alcohol over time: If your evening beer or glass of wine at dinner has eventually turned into four or more drinks, you may be developing an addiction. When a person becomes more tolerant of alcohol or drugs, they need more of it to feel the same pleasant feelings, and over time it can be harder to limit one’s intake.
  • You’re drinking to cope with unpleasant or stressful situations: Are you burned out from work? Stressed out from job hunting after being unemployed? Depressed about not seeing your friends during the pandemic? If you’re drinking to cope with these situations, you may be developing an unhealthy dependence on alcohol that can morph into addiction.
  • You’re as preoccupied with buying alcohol as you are with buying groceries: In taking stock of your necessities when running errands, if you find that buying alcohol is as important to you as ingredients for dinner, it’s possible your drinking habits have worsened. This doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve developed alcoholism, but addiction is a slippery slope.
  • You experience withdrawal symptoms when you don’t drink: Do you wake up the next day after drinking with severe headaches, sweating, nausea, and other symptoms? Does going without alcohol make you feel physically ill? You could be experiencing withdrawal, a clear indicator that your body has become dependent on alcohol.

If you think you or someone you care about is drinking excessively during the pandemic and may be developing unhealthy habits, now might be the perfect time to take part in Alcohol Awareness Month and utilize the resources available to understand the dangers of alcoholism and how it can impact every part of your life, including your work and relationships.

Personalized Alcohol Addiction Treatment in Las Vegas

It’s understandable to believe that you can combat your addiction on your own. After all, alcohol is the most abused substance in the United States, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and there are countless individuals out there who have drinking problems but believe they don’t need help.

However, there are many benefits to alcohol rehab that can help you navigate sobriety in a healthy and empowering way. At The Nestled Recovery Center, we offer treatments from psychotherapy and group support groups to EMDR and mindfulness programs. We also offer a medical detox program to help you rid your body of toxins in a safe and supervised environment. Our team goes above and beyond to ensure our patients feel comfortable and cared for as they begin their recoveries.

Call The Nestled Recovery Center today at (702) 299-6406, or fill out our online form to learn more about how we treat alcohol addiction at our Las Vegas rehab center. Our intimate 10-bed facility allows us to give each of our patients the personalized treatment they deserve.

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